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S-no love for Valentine’s Day-dependent businesses

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WATERTOWN -- Every February 14 there are a flurry of heartfelt orders to fill at Agnew Florist in Watertown.

Owner Dina Daddario and her crew know the drill, but they have to put the "petal" to the metal this time because of the incoming snowstorm.

"We want to get everything out as early as possible because we don't know how it's going to roll," said Daddario of the storm.

She made sure to ship out more than half her Valentine's Day orders on Valentine's Eve, which meant employees popped in earlier and worked faster on Friday to get thousands of roses wrapped and ready for delivery.

Daddario said most customers don't mind the one-day early bouquets and it gives her piece of mind because her drivers are safer. "Last year we were delivering right after a snowstorm and one of our vans went into a snowdrift," she said of the storm that hit on February 12, 2014.

The impending flakes are causing a different issue in the restaurant world.

The owners at Gayles Depot Square Farm Shoppe fear the forecast will literally spoil their plans. "We went all out and bought a lot of product that we don't normally buy," said Gayle Clark.

She and her husband, co-owner Gino Clark, prepared a special Valentine's Day Dinner menu with lots of seafood.

"You can't just keep it and sell it, you know, two days later," she said. "The only day we close early is Sunday. You know, to say, 'oh everybody make your plans Sunday night,' doesn't help us, and we're certainly not gonna serve all that on a Monday."

The holiday falling on a Saturday was supposed to be a win-win for businesses and customers, but Mother Nature isn't showing the love.

"If there is a blizzard or everyone is afraid to leave their home --  and we'll have, we have twice the staff coming --  we're going to lose money instead of make money," said Clark, who of course hopes the snow doesn't pan out.