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Hartford students build generator for Nepalese Village

HARTFORD -- 14 students at Hartford High School's Academy of Science and Green Technology are putting the pieces together, working on a project that is designed to change the lives for villagers in a far away Nepalese hamlet.

The project is called Nepal 3.0, it is the latest and greatest undertaking for engineering teacher David Mangus. The project centers around the students drafting and building green friendly generator which will help power vital needs for the village in Nepal.

"What we are trying to do is energize and electrify the upper regions of Nepal along the Chinese border," said Mangus. "They don't have reliable electricity in any of the villages until we put it there."

The generator will provide villagers the ability to make simple copies of birth certificates, charge laptops and power refrigerators to store life saving vaccines.

The hybrid electric solar and wind generator is being constructed by the students at Hartford High who look forward to making an impact for fellow students a world away.

"The bigger picture is to give them more hope. It's helping kids that need it, so it's cool," said senior Aramis Rodriguez.

"It's empowering, we can better their future," added senior Philisha Jordan.

The generator is sponsored in part by the Werth Family Foundation and UTC. The student powered project is set to be completed on June 1, then flown to Katmandu and ultimately transported (in pieces) by yak up to the village that sits 15 thousand feet above sea level.

Mangus laughed that for projects headed for such remote locations like this, "Everything has to be "Yak-albe".