State SAT scores rose in 2017, achievement gap still exists

MERIDEN -- SAT scores are going up in Connecticut.

The Connecticut State Department of Education (CSDE) today announced results from the 2017 administration of the Connecticut School Day SAT. The results show the percentage of 11th-graders who took the exam that are meeting or exceeding the achievement standard increased in English language arts by 0.4 percentage points from 65.0 to 65.4 percent, and in mathematics by 2.0 percentage points from 39.3 to 41.3 percent. On the SAT’s 200–800 point scale, average ELA scores are up by four points from 520 to 524, and by five points from 502 to 507 in mathematics over the year.

Fourteen Alliance Districts outpaced the state improvement in English language arts, while 11 Alliance Districts outpaced the state improvement in mathematics. Improvement was also evidenced among vulnerable student groups.

Complete results are available on EdSight.

“With graduation rates at record highs and 11th-graders showing improvement in both subjects on the SAT, Connecticut students are preparing for college and career like never before,” said Governor Dannel Malloy. “No longer does the cost of a test prevent a Connecticut student from applying to college and following his or her dreams. Still, we know we have more work to do to ensure every student has what it takes to succeed in college and career. When we raise the bar for our students and for ourselves, we rise to the challenge together and push for a brighter future for all.”

Statewide, 96% of 11th-grade students participated in the 2017 Connecticut School Day SAT.

While black and Hispanic students showed improvement in both subjects, achievement gaps persist. 36.8% of black students and 39.6% of Hispanic students met or exceeded the achievement standard in ELA, compared with 78.5% of white students. In math, 12.5% of black students and 16.5% of Hispanic students met or exceeded the achievement standard, compared with 53.4% of white students. Similar disparities continue to exist among high needs students, but improvement was seen for English language learners, students with disabilities, and students from low-income families.

English Language Arts      
  Percentage   Average  
  Level 3 o4 4   Scale Score  
Student Group 2015-16 2016-17 2015-16 2016-17
All Students 65 65.4 520 524
Asian 78.9 79.8 565 577
Black or African American 36.4 36.8 451 456
Hispanic/Latino 39 39.6 457 460
Two or More Races 63.7 68.3 517 529
White 77.4 78.5 548 555
High Needs 37.1 37.4 453 456
Female 67.1 69 525 533
Male 63 61.8 514 515
Special Education 22.5 23.9 423 426
Free Meals Eligible 36.1 36.4 451 454
Reduced Price Meals Eligible 51.1 54.6 481 493
English Learners 3.5 5.6 380 384
         
         
  Mathematics      
  Percentage   Average  
  Level 3 o4 4   Scale Score  
Student Group 2015-16 2016-17 2015-16 2016-17
All Students 39.3 41.3 502 507
Asian 67.2 66.5 582 588
Black or African American 12.4 12.5 431 432
Hispanic/Latino 15.5 16.5 438 440
Two or More Races 33.4 39.8 493 508
White 49.9 53.4 529 537
High Needs 14.5 15.3 434 438
Female 37.9 40.2 499 504
Male 40.8 42.4 504 509
Special Education 7.7 8.9 400 408
Free Meals Eligible 13.6 14 432 435
Reduced Price Meals Eligible 22.2 27.6 462 474
English Learners 3.4 3.6 382 387