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Connecticut leaders react to President Trump’s remarks on Charlottesville

HARTFORD -- What began as a press conference about infrastructure spiraled into a spontaneous response by President Trump that appeared to defend white nationalists in Charlottesville.

"I think there`s blame on both sides. You look at both sides, I think there's blame on both sides. I have no doubt about it. But you also had people, very fine people on both sides," said President Trump in an impromptu press conference in the lobby of Trump Tower.

The aftermath of the press conference forced several CEOs around the country to resign from Trump's manufacturing council.

Connecticut's Mark Bertolini, who runs Aetna, released a statement condemning the remarks.

"I am ashamed of our President`s behavior and comments," says Bertolini. "We all breathe the same air, we all want the same thing for our children's future, and we all aspire for the pursuit of happiness and good health for our families and friends. We are not a country of hate, and we are all judged by our own god based on the compassion and humanity we show others."

Connecticut political leaders followed suit by coming out with swift, emotional reactions.

"I think the president is out of his mind," said Democratic Governor Dannel Malloy. "They were unhinged, he was unhinged. And he has done great damage to America's standing in the world."

Democratic Senator Richard Blumenthal appeared on FOX61 to completely refute Trump's claim of wrongdoing on both sides.

"The blame is 100 percent on one side," said Senator Blumenthal. "And here it is on the side of white supremacists, the Neo Nazi`s, the KKK clansmen and the white nationalists who came to incite violence and eventually spurred the death of an innocent bystander."

It wasn't only the Democrats in Connecticut who had something to say. Connecticut GOP Chair JR Romano said the president had a lack in tact in dealing with a delicate situation. Romano now feels the best course of action moving forward would be to create a summit of leaders in the state from all walks of life.

"I think we need to get Democrats, Republicans and religious leaders in a room and start talking about addressing this counter culture that's happening," said Romano.