State Republicans budget proposal includes retirement incentive

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HARTFORD -- Connecticut Republicans are not happy information was leaked after a closed-door meeting with the Governor and Democrats.

Leaders have been holding bi-partisan talks for several weeks now, to figure out how to fix a growing hole in the budget.

Republicans presented their plan for budget shortfalls during talks Thursday morning, but by the afternoon details were leaked.

Friday they decided to release their ideas publicly.

"I want a hundred percent trust in that room,” said Senator Len Fasano, “and if we can't have that then let's just not have the room."

Angry words in response to the leaked details on how republicans want to steer Connecticut out of, what they call,a permanent fiscal crisis.

"Unfortunately we have a long-term problem, a short-term problem, and an immediate problem,” said Representative Themis Klarides, “we have to prioritize that somehow."

Republican ideas include, offering a retirement incentive program to state employees eligible to retire.

It would give individuals three years credit toward pensions and benefits.

A state analysis estimates, if 1800 workers sign up, Connecticut would save almost two hundred million dollars in two years.

GOP lawmakers also want to change state employees' pension and health benefits, and overtime.

They also want the legislature to have final say on labor contracts, creating a mandatory vote on negotiated deals.

For tax relief, republicans pitch eliminating the controversial unitary combined reporting,put in place by the legislature this past session.

It had companies like general electric threatening to leave.

Republicans agree on certain cuts ordered by the Governor, but want to restore funding to hospitals, Medicaid, and those with developmental disabilities.

Governor Malloy gave his take later in the day, saying there is commonality on some of the tax changes, certain cuts, and also the call for a transportation lockbox.

"I think there is lots to work with,” said Malloy. “I think the Democrats have to come out with their proposals and then, first things first, let's circle everything that we agree on, let's talk about the things we don't agree on."