Meriden woman facing deportation is granted a reprieve

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MERIDEN --   Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty said Nelly Cumbicos, a Meriden mom set for deportation, got a reprieve from federal immigration officials Monday afternoon.

“I’m heartened by the news that Nelly will be with her family for the foreseeable future,” Esty said. “Nelly has no criminal record, and she works hard to raise her son, an American citizen who is studying computer science. Her husband is also an American citizen, a taxpayer, and a hardworking, dues-paying union member. Our tax dollars are not infinite: we should be using our resources to target criminals and dangerous individuals, not good people like Nelly.”

Dozens of community members came to the Meriden town hall meeting Monday night in support of Nelly and her family.

Several men and women spoke urging the community to come together against ICE's deportation efforts.

"Keep immigrant families together. Keep my family together. Keep my mother where she belongs. In this great country," said Jim Chuquirima, Nelly's son.

According to a GoFundMe page for Cumbicos, she arrived to the United States 18-years ago to be with her family who had escaped Ecuador years earlier under death threats.

"While crossing the border, she and some other young women were kidnapped by banditos and held hostage for money. As the women were being relocated to another hiding spot, a motor vehicle accident occurred, and the police rescued the women," the GoFundMe page reads. "Because the women were undocumented, the border patrol got involved and Nelly was relocated to CT to be closer to her family with instructions that ICE would be getting in touch with her. This never happened."

In a release issued by Esty, Cumbicos said she is happy with the latest news regarding her situation.

“My family and I are very thankful for this news,” Cumbicos said. “It has been very hard living with the uncertainty of our situation, but I am happy that our community came together to support us. I came to this country to escape criminal violence that threatened my family. I only hope that I am able to stay and build a better life.”