UConn alleges numerous NCAA violations by former coach Kevin Ollie

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

STORRS --  An investigation into former UConn basketball coach Kevin Ollie, states that he violated NCAA rules which then lead to his firing.

More than 1,300 pages of documents reveal a list of NCAA violations.

The documents, first obtained by the Hartford Courant, state that Ollie facilitated a phone call between a recruit and former UConn star Ray Allen.

The documents allege that Ollie played basketball with a recruit during an official visit to UConn. He is also accused of getting a personal friend to train his players off campus.

These are just the highlights of a long list of allegations. On March 10, UConn released a statement saying they were moving to terminate Ollie.

Ollie went on to accuse UConn of violating his constitutional rights by firing him for cause and claim they are avoiding the eight-figure payout a termination without cause would have demanded.

On the table is $10 million that Ollie feels he is owed under the contact he signed with the program. Ollie was is in the second year of a five-year $17.9-million contract.

Executive Director of American Association of University Professors, Michael Bailey, released a three page letter defending the coach.

"Just cause to fire Coach Ollie under the terms of the collective bargaining agreement did not exist on March 10, 2018, and just cause does not exist today. Coach Ollie will surely prevail in the arbitration proceeding that is to follow, but at great expense to his reputation and his career. All citizens of the state who are concerned about the integrity of  4 the University of Connecticut need to be aware of the unfair, double standard applied to Coach Ollie and should speak out against this blatant inequity."

You can full letter here.

Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.