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EPA rolls back Obama-era coal pollution rules as Trump heads to West Virginia

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HUNTINGTON, UT - OCTOBER 9: Emissions rise out of a large smoke stack at Pacificorp's 1000 megawatt coal fired power plant on October 9, 2017 outside Huntington, Utah. The Trump administration's EPA will repeal the Clean Power Plan, that was put in place by the Obama administration. (Photo by George Frey/Getty Images)

As his Environmental Protection Agency delivers its latest blow to environmental regulations aimed at reducing carbon emissions, President Donald Trump is heading into the heart of coal country to deliver the good news.

Trump will join supporters in Charleston, West Virginia, for a political rally on Tuesday to celebrate his administration’s proposal to allow states to set their own emissions standards for coal-fueled power plants.

The move would reverse Obama administration efforts to combat climate change and marks the fulfilment of a campaign promise at the heart of his appeal in coal-producing states like West Virginia.

The EPA Tuesday morning formally unveiled the details of its new plan to devolve regulation of coal-fired power plants back to the states, one that is expected to give a boost to the coal industry and increase carbon emissions nationwide.

The move is just the latest effort by the Trump administration to revive an ailing coal industry and strip climate change-fighting regulations established by the Obama administration. He previously announced plans to withdraw from the Paris climate accords, calling it an unfair deal for Americans.

“I was elected by the citizens of Pittsburgh,” Trump said at the time, “not Paris.”

Trump’s promise to revive the coal industry was embodied by Trump’s campaign stops in coal producing regions of West Virginia, Kentucky and Pennsylvania, where Trump supporters waved “Trump Digs Coal” signs and where the President-to-be donned a coal mining helmet.

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