Leaders around the world, including Connecticut, react to the mass killings at a Pittsburgh synagogue

The massacre of 11 people at a synagogue in Pittsburgh was felt around the nation and the globe.

Leaders from across the world issued statements of condolences.

Here are some of their comments:

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu issued a video statement, posted to Twitter.

“The entire people of Israel grieve with the families of the dead,” he said. “We stand together with the Jewish community of Pittsburgh. We stand together with the American people in the face of this horrendous anti-Semitic brutality.”

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said the hearts of his nation’s people are with the Jewish community.

“May the families of those murdered be comforted, and may the injured recover quickly and fully,” he wrote on Twitter.

Angela Merkel, chancellor of Germany, said the people killed and wounded were victims of “blind anti-Semitic hate.”

“My sympathies are for the families; I wish for strength + recovery for the victims. We all must stand resolutely against anti-Semitism — everywhere,” she said, according to spokesman Steffen Seibert, who tweeted her comments in German.

First Lady Melania Trump said the violence needs to stop and the people of the United States need to unite through God.

“My heart breaks over the news out of #Pittsburgh,” she wrote on Twitter.

Ivanka Trump, one of the President’s daughters and a close adviser who converted to Judaism when she married Jared Kushner, said the United States’ people supports Jews.

“America is stronger than the acts of a depraved bigot and anti-semite,” she tweeted. “All good Americans stand with the Jewish people to oppose acts of terror and share the horror, disgust & outrage over the massacre in Pittsburgh. We must unite against hated & evil. God bless those affected.”

Outgoing US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley also said her heart was breaking.

“An attack on the most sacred of places is the cruelest and most cowardly act a person can do,” she tweeted. “There is and will never be any tolerance for hate.”

Pope Francis led prayers for Pittsburgh on Sunday in St. Peter’s Square, a day after a gunman who had expressed hatred of Jews opened fire in the synagogue during Sabbath services, killing 11 people.

Francis prayed for the dead, injured and their families and said: “In reality, all of us are wounded by this inhuman act of violence.” He prayed for God “to help us to extinguish the flames of hatred that develop in our societies, reinforcing the sense of humanity, respect for life and civil and moral values.”

Francis has frequently spoken out against religiously inspired violence and has denounced the easy availability of guns thanks to weapons manufacturers, whom he has called “merchants of death.”

Here are a few statements from local Connecticut leaders:

Governor Malloy said, “We mourn with Pittsburgh and the Tree of Life community on this dark day. Today’s senseless attack is yet another tragic reminder that hatred, intolerance, and violence consume the hearts of too many individuals. It is unconscionable that people continue to be targeted for death because of the religion they practice, country of their birth, who they love, or the color of their skin. No one in this great nation should ever fear violence at their place of worship…  As blood continues to be senselessly spilled, Washington complicity caves to the will of the gun lobby. Enough is enough. We have proved in Connecticut that commonsense gun laws can prevent shootings and save lives. .”

Senator Richard Blumenthal tweeted out, “Our hearts break & stomachs turn after these shameful anti-Semitic murders. My thoughts are with the families & brave law enforcement. Congress is complicit—by its inaction—in this loathsome epidemic of gun violence.”

Senator Chris Murphy said on Twitter, “Not again…not again. My heart is breaking for the victims, the families, the congregation, and police officers in Pittsburgh.”