What’s on your Spring #CTBucketList?

Survivor of Las Vegas mass shooting sues employer

LAS VEGAS, NEVADA - OCTOBER 01: The marquee at Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino displays a #VEGASSTRONGER message as a tribute to those killed in last year's massacre across the street from the property on October 1, 2018 in Las Vegas, Nevada. On October 1, 2017, Stephen Paddock opened fire from the 32nd floor of Mandalay Bay on the Route 91 Harvest country music festival killing 58 people and injuring more than 800 in the deadliest mass shooting event in U.S. history. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

TORRINGTON, Conn. (AP) — A Connecticut man who survived the 2017 mass shooting at a Las Vegas music festival says in a lawsuit he was told to “suck it up” and “get over it” after informing his employers he was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder.

Charles Giampaolo says in his suit filed Tuesday that Torrington-based Elevator Service Co. discriminated against him, subjected him to a hostile work environment, and retaliated against him, all in violation of state law, eventually prompting his to resign.

The Torrington man is seeking unspecified damages.

The Hartford Courant reports that one of the company’s owners, Steve Roth, declined comment when reached at home.

Giampaolo was not injured but his father-in-law was among the 58 killed in the October 2017 shooting at the Route 91 Harvest Music Festival.

Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.