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Tim Lammers is an anchor for the FOX61 Morning News Monday-Friday mornings from 4-10 a.m.

A native of South Windsor, Tim came to FOX61 in 2002 as a Sports Producer and never left. Since then, he has filled the roles of Anchor, Reporter, Producer and Videographer in the Sports Department, as well as being a News Feature and Health Reporter.

Tim’s main beat in the Sports Department was following the UConn Football program’s rise to national respectability, including the school’s first-ever BCS Bowl berth in the 2011 Fiesta Bowl in Glendale, AZ. He also covered the UConn Men’s Basketball team’s third National Championship at the 2012 Final Four in Houston, TX.

As a health reporter, Tim turned the camera around to do a Emmy-nominated story about his own challenge of finding a treatment for Avascular Necrosis, a rare degenerative bone disease he has. The story culminated in Tim going under the knife, on camera, to receive a cutting-edge stem cell transplant using his own bone marrow. Since then, he has received a constant response from the story, as people all over the world have contacted him to find out more about the procedure and the disease.

Tim lives with his wife, Kerri, whom he met while they were co-workers at FOX61, and his step-son Alex. Tim and Kerri married in 2016.


Recent Articles
  • FOX61 Family First: A new online, school-based mentoring program in New Britain

    NEW BRITAIN — Later this year, in late September or early October, Nutmeg Big Brothers Big Sisters will officially start a new, more modern approach to mentoring – a school-based, predominantly online mentoring program called mentor2.0. It’s an ambitious program. While, for now, it will only apply to incoming ninth-graders at the CREC Academy of Science and Innovation in New Britain, it’s going to apply to all 110 of them. The school’s principal, Bob McCain, said the need is evident. […]

  • Health Watch: Hi-tech helps ER patients along with women trying not to get pregnant.

    Patients at Santa Clara Medical Center in California are using an innovative way to help them tolerate medical procedures – virtual reality goggles. Thanks to a grant, the medical center uses goggles in four departments to take patients on an underwater adventure. “The virtual reality goggles are very helpful to assist in, kind of, providing a comfortable atmosphere for the patients so that they can tolerate their procedures better,” said Dr. Joel Levis, the ER Chief of the center. In […]

  • Garden teaches students and citizens about medicine history

    WEST HARTFORD — The latest tour of the The University of Saint Joseph’s medicine garden is for some exchange students from Japan. They went to the garden, inside Hartford’s Elizabeth Park, to learn more about the history of modern medicine. Dr. Dayne Laskey guided them around, showing them different plants, and how they’re used both in herbal remedies and how they’re used to help produce modern pharamceuticals. “I am interested in pharmacy,” said Manae Yoshiki, a 16-year-old sophomore from Tokyo, […]

  • Same-day joint replacements: Simplifying the process

    FARMINGTON — Sometimes, medical advances don’t happen in one big “Eureka!” moment. Sometimes, like with hip and knee replacements, they happen slowly, over the span of many years, as much from a change in thinking as anything. While the advancements have been slow and steady, the result is that knee and hip replacement patients, like Mark Lafontaine of Willington are getting out of the hospital more quickly than ever, even though his replacement was considered a complex case because of […]

  • Summer dental injuries – how to save a damaged tooth

    HARTFORD —  According to Dr. Jillian Wallen, a Pediatric Dentist and Associate Professor at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, dental injuries spike in the summer for two age ranges – toddlers, who are learning to walk, and early teens who are playing sports. “There is a range of trauma, from a concussion, where your tooth is only bumped to a chipped tooth where only the outer part of the tooth or enamel is broken,” Wallen said, “The most severe […]

  • The time to start planning allergy avoidance at school is now

    HARTFORD — Nearly 6,000,000 children in the U.S. have food allergies, an average of about two per class, which means a lot of parents could help safeguard their little ones during the school year by doing a little pre-planning now. Dr. B.J. Lanser, an allergist at National Jewish Health in Denver, has four simple tips to help make sure your child doesn’t encounter an allergen, and to make sure they come out okay if they do: The first is to […]

  • Health Watch: Overprescribing opioids, dehydration, and tanning risks

    New research suggested that doctors are still over-prescribing opioid medications for minor injuries. Research at the University of Pennsylvania looked at 30,000 insurance claims from people who went to an Emergency Department with a sprained ankle. Researchers found one quarter of them got an opioid prescription, with the average being a 15-day supply of a low-dose opioid. However, some of them got 30 pills of a medium-strength opioid, and about 5 % of them eventually progressed to further opioid use. […]

  • Dental laser replaces drill, promises cheaper, pain-free dentist visits

    NORTH HAVEN —  North Haven dentist Dr. David Fantarella said he was the first dentist in the world to sign up to buy a relatively new type of dental laser, one that he said is the present and future of his dental practice. In fact, he believes in the laser, called Solea, so much, that he invested in the company that makes it, Convergent Dental. Solea shined in a demonstration to FOX61. Dr. Fantarella used it to clean out and […]

  • Health watch: Screen time and ADHD; meatless burgers

    HARTFORD —  For a long time, there’s been an association between kids having too much screen time, and developing Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD), or, but a new study looked at whether the type of screen time mattered. That study, published in the journal JAMA, concluded that, while more research needs to be done to confirm the findings, the type of platform didn’t matter. Whether it’s old-fashioned TV, or browsing social media on a smartphone, some is okay, but too […]

  • FOX61 Family First: Coping with the loss of a pet

    It can be hard enough losing the family dog, cat or other pet, but trying to figure out how to help children cope can add to the challenge at an already difficult time. It would be nice if there were one easy template to follow, but that’s not too realistic according to Dr. Laura Saunders, a Psychologist at the Institute For Living in Hartford. She said parents will have to personalize their approach based on the age and maturity of […]